Arts

Playlist: Briony’s Summer Anthems

“Summertime is here again, and my hayfever is through the roof. Thankfully sitting inside and sneezing gave me an excuse to make up a new Anthem playlist full of excellent female tracks to listen to whether you’re out on the beach or hiding from the sun like me…”

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Click here to listen: Briony’s Summer Anthems

‘Heroes’: A Review

Picture this: you’re sitting inside your University exam hall, your clothing style has changed, your hair is longer (or shorter!), and you’ve already planned your “We made it through our degree!!!” house party. But then suddenly, it hits you. The past three years have flown past quicker than you imagined.

You, sitting there, paused mid-sentence. The sudden fear of having to enter adulthood strikes: getting a job, paying off your debt, potentially get married or having children, then watching your children continue the ongoing circle we call life. Your future flashes before your eyes quicker than you can finish that sentence you paused on. As you ponder your existence during a quarter-life crisis, you could say you’d like to become a superhero.

“Student Finance cannot cover a Superhero, let alone a degree!”

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Heroes is a play written & directed by Sian Brett, co-directed by Frankie Jolly, and is a part of Box Room Theatre Company and Goldsmiths Drama Society, 2016.

Every university student would relate to those first paragraphs. I know I’ve most definitely had similar thoughts on numerous occasions. University is not just about improving our fields of study, but our development as a person! So the idea of leaving this stressful-Utopian establishment, is quite frankly, frightening.

Heroes is a play which presents the contrasting pessimistic and optimistic anxieties of two third year English students sitting their final exam. Sian Brett, a name you’d be familiar with if you’re an Anthem regular, has voiced common, yet silent concerns among students such as:

  1. Am I spending more time at the pub than completing my University bucket list?
  2. Are our degrees even worth getting a part time job just to pay disgustingly overpriced rent? Then, having to scrape together the little time we have between lectures, societies, and reading to actually live our lives.
  3. Should I study a Masters Degree to continue my “University” experience? Or in reality, am I just delaying my entrance into adulthood??
  4. Am I going to be as extraordinary as I originally planned to be? Will even I make a significant change in the world? Because at the moment, we’re all uncooked potatoes.

“You’re a vile creature, you’re a student

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One of my biggest fears in life is not being remembered. I want to be extraordinary, and these exact thoughts are expressed in Heroes. As an audience member I was able to tag along with the characters’ search for an understanding of our life and how we contribute to social progression. Heroes welcomed me to the idea that anybody could change the world. No matter how big or small the situation is, you don’t need powers to be a hero.

You can’t talk about Heroes without mentioning the fabulous cast members Niamh O’Brien and Jazmin Qunta. The relationship between the two characters is organic; I didn’t see a performance, I saw life. I saw me and my home-dawg (hi Nicole) back in Loring Hall, eating Thai food while discussing our future….or watching High School Musical 2. The point I’m making here is that Heroes’ self deprecating nature allows the audience to chuckle their tits off whilst still projecting themselves onto the characters. It’s theatre which holds your hand and says to you: ‘Hey man! You’re not alone with this… I love you and everything, but your palm is really sweaty right now’.

Heroes It’s probably the most heartwarming downer I’ve ever experienced in theatre! The sooner we realise that all art is about death, the happier we’ll be in life.

To see more from Box Room Theatre, click here:
Facebook –  https://www.facebook.com/boxroomtheatre/?fref=ts
Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/boxroomtheatre/

Because I loved Heroes so much I’m giving it 5 Stars! (My dog is called Star and she is great)

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Words by Courtney McMahon
Images courtesy of Courtney McMahon and Box Room Theatre

#Cam4Art

Let’s just state the obvious here; we’re glued to our electronic devices. Even if you consider yourself someone who is not glued to an electronic product, you probably still use one to make life a bit easier. But this article is not about how you might ignore your Grandma to check on your Instagram likes, this article is about a new movement in the art world called #Cam4Art!

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#Cam4Art is a product of our time, an event responding to digital intimacy and our intense internet culture.

#Cam4Art is a live-streaming performance art event created by my home-dawg Kia Nicole Noakes and Nicholas Tee. #Cam4Art will be taking place between the 25th-30th of November 2016 and is possibly the most accessible piece of performance art you could ask for, and you should not miss out on this opportunity! Here are just a few of its benefits:

  •   #Cam4Art is completely free!
  •   Even if art is unlikely to gain a double tap from you, #Cam4Art includes over 30 artists from across the globe who produce different forms of performance art. So there’s a chance you’ll find someone you will enjoy!
  •   #Cam4Art is online! No matter where you are or what device you are using; you can watch and enjoy performance art without the hassle of leaving your house!
  •   If you miss the #Cam4Art event, it’s not a problem! The performances will be recorded for you to look back on!

Before you grab your diary and save the date, I’ve selected four female artists who I’ve taken an interest in and who will hopefully interest you also, and may even feed your feminist appetite!

Emily Roderick
“Microscope Performance II”
Friday, 25th Nov. 21:00 (GMT)

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Emily Roderick uses technology such as digital microscopes and screens to explore her body and surroundings during a live art performance, and you can see more of her work here: http://cargocollective.com/emilyroderick

Why did you choose performance art to express your work?
I find performance art one of the most interesting art forms for both the artist and the audience. With quite a strong interest in the senses, the body, and digital identity, performing my ideas felt like the most suited form. I am relatively new to performance but it already feels like a very valuable decision that I have made within my work.

What responses do you get from the feminist community?
The feminist community have been very supportive of the work that I make. I think what has been most intriguing is the interest and support of the technology that I am integrating into my performances and videos. It is great as a woman to be working with code and physical computing. Embracing a male-strong industry within my practice has brought me nothing but respect as an artist. Due to only recently getting my face into the art world, most of the support resonates on social media, which is great when I am referencing cyberfeminism and networked feminism. I hope that this support continues to build within the artists community.

Do you ever get any negative responses from people who claim to be feminists? If so, how do you respond?
I personally haven’t received any negative responses about my work or ideas. I’d like to think that people approve of my ideas and like to promote feminism, more recently cyberfeminism. If I were to receive anything negative, I would be interested in hearing their view and why they feel that way. I am not here to preach but would express the ideas of equality, and that art is a great platform to express these views to a wider audience.

Why have you chosen to participate to #Cam4Art?
I first saw mention of #Cam4Art through my university. I was attracted to the fact that the organisers were pitching their ideas to a wide range of artists and were keen to get students involved. The ideas seemed fresh, and looked to celebrate the online platforms that we have access to today, as well as suggesting new platforms for exhibiting work. Despite having a digital aspect to my work, I was yet to experiment with the online world to display my live performances. #Cam4Art seemed like the perfect way to explore the online community and give an alternative output of my current work.

Lindsay Dye
“Variety Show”

Friday, 25th Nov. 22:00 (GMT)

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Get ready for Lindsay Dye’s “Variety show”, where the clue’s in the name: webcam mutations, readings, and visuals. See more at: http://www.lindsaydye.com

Why did you decide to use your job as a Cam Girl in your art?
I was making art about internet relationships and Miami strip club culture while I was in graduate school in NYC. My research about sex work brought me to cam culture. I became a camgirl to analyze the community and to understand conceptual projects like the Camgirls Copyright Infringement Dress that cannot be worn in public, and the Buy Me Offline Shop, an e-store where you can purchase physical screenshot prints, originally used as blackmail from my chatroom clientele. Three years later, it’s my full-time job and continues to be a source of artistic fodder.

Do you ever get any negative responses from people who claim to be feminists? If so, how do you respond?
Disengagement is the most harmful response I receive from anyone. It’s painful when another human disregards your intellect because of your occupation. My long-term response has been the integration of my two jobs: camgirl and artist. This has made a smoother entrance to talk about sex work and feminism to both men and women through the art I make, and the chatrooms I inhabit. The response is that women and feminists are more than this one thing that supposedly defines us; we are complex and attach ourselves to many identifiers, by choice and by experience.

Why have you chosen to participate in #Cam4Art?
This show represents the exact space in which I’ve been working for the past few years, an autonomous one. Autonomy is the silver lining to camming and #Cam4Art’s fundamental concept, that is to exhibit work on the artist’s terms. The juiciest part is that performative work online becomes mutated immediately just by using the medium of the internet. The layering of audiences on multiple platforms becomes innumerable and lost. There’s a level to live-streaming that can’t be perceived.

Kate Durbin
“The Supreme Gentleman”
Saturday, 26th Nov. 20:00 (GMT)

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Kate Durbin will be streaming her pre-recorded work “The Supreme Gentleman”, which was created in response to the tragedy of the Isla Vista shooter, Elliot Roger. See more here: http://www.katedurbin.la

Why did you choose performance art to express your work?  
The Supreme Gentleman was initially commissioned for Yes All Women, an art benefit in Los Angeles created by Jessie Askinazi and emceed by Rose McGowan, with the proceeds going to the East Los Angeles Women’s Center. The Yes All Women benefit was inspired by the hashtag #YesAllWomen, which was created in response to Isla Vista shooter Elliot Rodger’s 2014 killing spree. Rodger espoused misogynist and racist beliefs on YouTube and gamer websites prior to his shooting rampage in my home state of California, and no-one did anything about it.

The Supreme Gentleman is a re-enactment of Rodger’s final YouTube address. It was important for me to physically embody Rodger’s words as the type of body he felt so entitled to: a white woman. I wore a long Lady Godiva wig and BMW panties because he objectified blonde women and cars (BMWs were his favourite). I spoke his horrible words out of my own mouth in order to diffuse their power; the change in tone of the voice reflects that these are not even Rodger’s words, but the words of a white supremacist patriarchy, a collective belief system larger than individuals.

What responses do you get from the feminist community?
A lot of people who consider themselves feminist like my work. The Supreme Gentleman was commissioned for a feminist project, the Yes All Women art auction benefiting the East Los Angeles Women’s Center.

Do you ever get any negative responses from people who claim to be feminists? If so, how do you respond?
I do, at times. I listen to critique but when it mischaracterizes my work
 or becomes hateful, I tune out. I don’t feel obligated to personally respond.

Why have you chosen to participate to #Cam4Art?
I want the work to continue to have an online viewership, especially now with a Trump presidency looming in my country. One of the things I was thinking about when I put the work back on YouTube, along with the addition of the karaoke sing-a-long text, is how we turn mass shooters into gods through the media. I was thinking of how we help that process along through clickbait. I am thinking about how we have done something similar with our current presidential election. As artists we can draw attention to this process, can try and interrupt it.

Seren Metcalfe
“Laying Within a Bed of Spring Greens”
Monday, 28th Nov. 22:00 (GMT)

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Seren Metcalfe’s performance focuses on the relationship between a person expressing emotion onto an inanimate item. Find out more here: http://www.serenmetcalfe.co.uk

Why did you choose performance art to express your work?
I wanted to convey a sense of intimacy and discomfort within my work as this just wasn’t being conveyed through the videos and photographs I was creating. I am a performer because I realised the only way for me to truly be intimate with the viewer is to be present. There is something amazing about a viewer being able to watch my body move,  hear the sound of my breath, and watch the emotions on my face in real time!

What responses do you get from the feminist community? Could you give an example?
I’m not sure about using the term ‘feminist community’ so exclusively but I guess my work is very self-empowering, and when I perform I put myself in a very vulnerable position. It’s strange when I get comments saying “you’re so brave for being able to do that”. I wonder if I would get the same reaction if I was a man performing? But then to flip that around, I think maybe the performance would be a greater success if I was a man portraying myself as vulnerable.

Do you ever get any negative responses from people who claim to be Feminist? If so, how do you respond?
I mean, I don’t think you have to be a feminist to understand my artwork. My artwork isn’t exclusively for a feminist audience, it’s for anyone.

Why have you chosen to participate to #Cam4Art?
I’ve done performances through webcam previously and they’ve been less successful so I’m really excited to develop something better than I have done previously. Its really great to be part of a network of so many unique performers. There’s a real sense of togetherness about it.

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If you are an artsy-fartsy individual like myself, it’s now time to consider: “Is live streaming the future for performance art?” (Huck Magazine). I believe that the #Cam4Art event will most definitely answer this question, so make sure to tune in between the 25th– 30th of November 2016 here: http://www.cam4art.com

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cam4art/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/cam4art.cam4art/?fref=ts

Images courtesy of #Cam4Art, Emily Roderick, Lindsay Dye, Kate Durbin and Seren Metcalfe.
Words by Courtney McMahon and external opinions from Emily Roderick, Lindsay Dye, Kate Durbin, and Seren Metcalfe.

Michiyo Yasuda: Seen But Not Heard

I remember the day I watched Spirited Away for the first time. I was 7 years old and my sister brought home the DVD because her friend had let her borrow it. It was the most outrageous, exciting, and heart wrenching film I had ever seen. I’ve probably watched it around 20 times by now. The story is one of those timeless, beautiful things that I will show my kids, and hopefully, even their kids. And it would never have been as magical as it is without Michiyo Yasuda.

Michiyo was the mastermind behind the vibrant colours and seamless design of some of Hayao Miyazaki’s most loved works. And after hearing the news of her passing last week, I thought it would be fitting to pay tribute to one of the most prominent women in animation history, in true Anthem style.

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Michiyo was born in Tokyo, 1939. Growing up then, women had sensible roles such as bank workers, and rarely held positions of power. However, her parents actively strayed away from traditional Asian child rearing practises, and encouraged Michiyo to pursue her love of the arts.

She began her career in animation straight out of secondary school with Toei Doga, nursing an active aversion to the ‘boring’ paths other women were pursuing. Toei Doga, a company not often heard of in the UK, were behind some major animations such as Dragon Ball and Sailor Moon. Not only that, but a handful of other renowned animators including Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata (Studio Ghibli founders), and even Leiji Matsumoto (the artist behind many of Daft Punk’s iconic music videos) also spent their early days there.

Michiyo began her career like most in the media field; at the bottom. Doing the laborious, time-consuming jobs with little recognition (shout-out to my media pals), but it soon paid off. In 1968, Michiyo Yasuda, Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata worked all together for the first time on the Little Norse Prince (1968) for Toei Doga. Although the film was not particularly popular after its release, Film4 heralded it a ‘key film in the history of anime’. And that it was. This was to be the beginning of the two most important business relationships for Michiyo, making striking and unique visual media to enchant the world.

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Michiyo was a part of Studio Ghibli from the very beginning. Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1984) was written by Miyazaki, and is often credited as the foundation of Studio Ghibli due to its incredible success in Japan. Michiyo by this point had sharpened her skills, and dedicated her attention to the incredible colour palettes of the films she worked on.

In an interview with the LA Times, Michiyo stated ‘Colour has a meaning, and it makes the film more easily understood. Colours and pictures can enhance what the situation is on-screen’. Despite this passion for colour and the clear importance it plays in Studio Ghibli’s work, Michiyo was rarely recognised as a major contributor in the company’s work. Many did not know her name and yet millions were touched by her enchanting work. From the painfully sad Grave of the Fireflies (1988) to completely confusing and adorable My Neighbour Totoro (1988). And let’s not forget the dazzling and exciting (and my personal fave) Howl’s Moving Castle (2004).

Michiyo’s legacy lives on. Her colours subtly brought Studio Ghibli’s stories to life, without screaming to be acknowledged.

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Although retiring after Ponyo (2008), she could not resist returning to work on The Wind Rises (2013) as a final contribution to Hayao Miyazaki’s work before his own retirement. Her work will forever pay a stunning tribute to the beauty of nature, and the wonder that can be seen in the most mundane of things.

She is an extraordinary example of a woman who worked her way up from the bottom, and even more so in such a male-orientated field. And she will forever inspire me to see the loveliness of things we so often take for granted.

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Words by Jessica Yang

Images courtesy of Studio Ghibli

 

Playlist: Noughties Anthems

“I made this a long time ago and forgot about it. I found it recently and have been dancing around my room listening to my childhood in the form of Sugababes, Rihanna, Nelly Furtado and Christina Aguilera. I know I made it, but I love it.

These women made grunge and punk cool and normal, they have become staples of the decade and their style and music inspired thousands of girls who still listen to Crazy in Love at pre-drinks ten years later. Icons of girl power in the making.”

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Click here to listen: Noughties Anthems

Playlist: Soundtrack Anthems

“This playlist is an ode to all those cringey ‘chick flicks’ and teen films that actually stand nowadays as almost iconic; key to the building of so many young women. Not a month goes by that I don’t see a Snapchat of the Legally Blonde opening credits. It’s motivational. The girls like Elle Wood, Mia Thermopolis and so many others are girls that make me so happy, and genuinely are like a little heart-warming pep talk. 

So enjoy my Soundtrack Anthems with some very retro treats from films like Bend It Like Beckham, Parent Trap (the amazing Lindsay Lohan one), and the classic Wild Child. If that’s not your taste, I put a few golden oldies in the mix too…”

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Click here to listen: Soundtrack Anthems

Courtney’s Anthems: Eating Ice Cream and Loving Yourself

“Music has always played an interesting role in my life. Especially as my first female role model came from music. Now I look up to any women in the music industry because it’s not so easy when you’re a super talented chick. I’m also happy to say I’ve seen some of these women perform live! So put on this playlist, grab a dark chocolate magnums and love yourself.

Seriously, love yourself it’s better than hating yourself *blows kisses*”

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Click here to listen: Courtney’s Anthems: Eating Ice Cream and Loving Yourself

 

Why You Should Listen to Hinds

July 2016: a month of dancing, sun burning, friendship, disposable cameras, DIY punch, and gross toilets. Yep, it’s festival season and I decided to ditch England and travel to Spain for BBK and Benicàssim Festival. Although I could babble on about how wonderful it was to watch Kendrick Lemar, Grimes, Tame Impala, Mac Demarco, and so on, there was one band that really made an impact on me this summer, and their name is Hinds.

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It’s not a secret that the music industry is a boiling mess when it comes to female liberation. I’m sure we can all agree that music is an expression; we love it, we dance to it, and most importantly we relate to it. Relating to music isn’t just about the overall topic of a song, it’s also who is presenting this topic. I think it’s safe to say that alternative music is dominated by the white male.

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Hinds are an all-female ensemble from Madrid, Spain. Let’s just say they’re probably the most inspiring and authentic young female musicians I’ve ever seen. They want to be sharing their music with us, and naturally, Hinds smash the patriarchy by doing so. Not only are Hinds hella talented, they’re also hella smart. During my Hinds research, I found that they’re often questioned about being a female ensemble; “Why only girls? Is it because you didn’t have any other choice? Or was it the only choice?”

To which band member Carlotta Cosials replied, “It was because we wanted to and it was the choice we chose. We thought that it would be so different If the rest of the band would be boys, people would probably think that we’re just the faces.”

Hinds knew that including men in their ensemble would distort the way they are viewed as female composers. Although some of us don’t give a fuck about gender, and enjoy art for what it is, there are still many who will assume the worst because they are female. The same interviewer later questioned if they made music with a feminist motive, to which Hinds replied “We are females writing music so you can’t avoid that.” Which is pretty self-explanatory, but the interviewer acted as if Hinds were the only female musicians making their music automatically controversial, and more likely to be disliked because they have vaginas.

If you haven’t already fallen in love with Hinds, I’ll give you another reason to follow them on Spotify. Hinds refuse to be anything else other than themselves. Hinds are smart enough to reject the music industry’s misogynistic expectations, they’re not here to change the world, they’re here to be artists.

“I felt perfect in the world being a girl and suddenly in music you’re judged about everything you do, how you sing, how you pose, how you dress, how you write, everything.” Carlotta Cosials also brings up that there are a lot more women in popular music than alternative. If popular music is your cuppa-tea you know that only one type of woman is being represented, the idealistic woman. With alternative music being loud, dirty, and expressive, it’s encouraged to be loud, dirty, and expressive, but when you have a pussy, all of a sudden your behaviour is questioned.

Now before you go off to listen to Hinds on Spotify, I want you to do a small task for yourself. Go to your iTunes/Spotify artists section, and note down which bands/artists are female. Once you’ve done that you can share your results wherever, or just use them as a stimulation to listen to more female artists!

Here’s a cute photo of Team Poo Boy meeting Hinds at Benicàssim.

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Peace, Love, and Cacti
Courtney McMahon

 

Playlist: Briony’s Anthems – Sisters Are Doin’ It For Themselves

“I’ve always found music to be one of the strongest ways of feeling girl power. That’s what the Spice Girls were all about, after all. My playlist is a mixture of songs where I shout the lyrics at people, and can almost feel my lungs getting larger, or songs that I think are just kick-ass.

You’ll have to excuse the excess of Sia tracks, but I promise I cut it down from around 6 or 7 to just 3. I just want every girl, and to be honest, every person to be able to clap and shout to Dog Days Are Over and That’s Not My Name to their hearts content. You go girl xo”

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Click on the image, or here to listen: Briony’s Anthems – Sisters Are Doin’ It For Themselves

Playlist: Maxene’s Anthems

“I came to uni with about as much music knowledge as your average snail, and so this playlist almost entirely consists of some pretty amazing recommendations by some pretty fabulous people.

Whatever your music taste I’d say I’ve got you covered here with a wonderfully random assortment of songs sung by equally wonderful women. Take this opportunity to sing and dance along to your heart’s content, because really, how else are you going to truly appreciate the epic-ness of these songs and their creators”

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Click on the image, or here to listen: Maxene’s Anthems