comedy

‘Watermelon’: A Review

“It’s okay if the love of your life is your best friend”

Last Sunday night I had the absolute pleasure of watching Box Room Theatre’s production of ‘Watermelon’ at the Hen and Chickens Theatre in London, as part of the Camden Fringe. The play was written by Georgia Green and takes a new and exciting look at the role of female friendships in modern life. Quite simply, Watermelon follows two girls named Abbie (Alexandra Proudfoot) and Zoe (Grace Hudson) on a night out, and a boy they bring home named Joe (Henry Taylor). Yet in just 55 minutes, it manages to introduce so many different layers and subtle hints at a wider life I desperately wanted to know. 

In case you hadn’t guessed, I loved Watermelon (and I don’t even like the fruit). The piece was exciting and dynamic, and ultimately showed the immense skill of Box Room Theatre in all aspects, particularly in the writing, and acting that came from Abbie, Zoe and Joe.

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To me, it felt like a case study of sorts on all the different relationships we have. The cast of Watermelon portrayed fantastic chemistry but were equally all able to hold their own in scenes. A relationship between a girl and the stranger trying to sleep with their best friend is one I hadn’t seen before, but thoroughly enjoyed; the sharp dialogue between the two was constant and entertaining. 

One thing I found most interesting was how it showed the friendship between Abbie and Zoe. A lot of things they showed, I had never experienced with my female friends such as taking boys home or discussing sex lives, but then there were so many things I had experienced a hundred times over, like the classic boy talks or even facial hair bleaching… It got me thinking about how no one female friendship is really the same, and how lovely that is.

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Watermelon is a beautifully open piece of theatre that takes the audience’s hand and invites them to share these experiences. Friendships are complex and can involve so much worry, and so to have a piece of theatre normalise that in front of my very eyes was comforting. 

Although very lively and, at times, laugh out loud funny, the piece also enters into some intense scenes, and some equally tranquil ones too. Fear and paranoia come into play when Abbie’s character goes missing in the night, and the relationship between Zoe and Joe develops immensely through the next half an hour of the play. They took a little slice of everyday reality and gave it so much life and depth; the audience is thrown into the drama with no warning, and it allows you to experience a great deal more emotion whichever way it swings.

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In the above photo, you can see one of my favourite scenes of the play. The team at Box Room have a huge imagination but are clever in their delivery. This simple use of fairy lights and music gave such intelligent lightness to the personal drama Zoe’s character was going through. I genuinely thought about the light sequences for the whole week after, I loved it that much.

Watermelon is an excellent example of young new writing that we should be paying attention to in the theatre. A simplistic but secretly challenging piece that is dotted with feminist quandaries most of us face on a regular basis (but perhaps aren’t as brave as Zoe when it comes to resolution). There’s so much to discover and explore that it’s hard not to love.

Four Stars for Watermelon!

 

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Words by Briony Brake
Images from Box Room Theatre

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‘Heroes’: A Review

Picture this: you’re sitting inside your University exam hall, your clothing style has changed, your hair is longer (or shorter!), and you’ve already planned your “We made it through our degree!!!” house party. But then suddenly, it hits you. The past three years have flown past quicker than you imagined.

You, sitting there, paused mid-sentence. The sudden fear of having to enter adulthood strikes: getting a job, paying off your debt, potentially get married or having children, then watching your children continue the ongoing circle we call life. Your future flashes before your eyes quicker than you can finish that sentence you paused on. As you ponder your existence during a quarter-life crisis, you could say you’d like to become a superhero.

“Student Finance cannot cover a Superhero, let alone a degree!”

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Heroes is a play written & directed by Sian Brett, co-directed by Frankie Jolly, and is a part of Box Room Theatre Company and Goldsmiths Drama Society, 2016.

Every university student would relate to those first paragraphs. I know I’ve most definitely had similar thoughts on numerous occasions. University is not just about improving our fields of study, but our development as a person! So the idea of leaving this stressful-Utopian establishment, is quite frankly, frightening.

Heroes is a play which presents the contrasting pessimistic and optimistic anxieties of two third year English students sitting their final exam. Sian Brett, a name you’d be familiar with if you’re an Anthem regular, has voiced common, yet silent concerns among students such as:

  1. Am I spending more time at the pub than completing my University bucket list?
  2. Are our degrees even worth getting a part time job just to pay disgustingly overpriced rent? Then, having to scrape together the little time we have between lectures, societies, and reading to actually live our lives.
  3. Should I study a Masters Degree to continue my “University” experience? Or in reality, am I just delaying my entrance into adulthood??
  4. Am I going to be as extraordinary as I originally planned to be? Will even I make a significant change in the world? Because at the moment, we’re all uncooked potatoes.

“You’re a vile creature, you’re a student

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One of my biggest fears in life is not being remembered. I want to be extraordinary, and these exact thoughts are expressed in Heroes. As an audience member I was able to tag along with the characters’ search for an understanding of our life and how we contribute to social progression. Heroes welcomed me to the idea that anybody could change the world. No matter how big or small the situation is, you don’t need powers to be a hero.

You can’t talk about Heroes without mentioning the fabulous cast members Niamh O’Brien and Jazmin Qunta. The relationship between the two characters is organic; I didn’t see a performance, I saw life. I saw me and my home-dawg (hi Nicole) back in Loring Hall, eating Thai food while discussing our future….or watching High School Musical 2. The point I’m making here is that Heroes’ self deprecating nature allows the audience to chuckle their tits off whilst still projecting themselves onto the characters. It’s theatre which holds your hand and says to you: ‘Hey man! You’re not alone with this… I love you and everything, but your palm is really sweaty right now’.

Heroes It’s probably the most heartwarming downer I’ve ever experienced in theatre! The sooner we realise that all art is about death, the happier we’ll be in life.

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Because I loved Heroes so much I’m giving it 5 Stars! (My dog is called Star and she is great)

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Words by Courtney McMahon
Images courtesy of Courtney McMahon and Box Room Theatre